Displaced Colombians

Childrren of PTH Refugees Jaque PanamaThe conflict in Colombia has displaced more than 5 million people, making it one of the largest displacement crises in the world. Armed groups associated with drug trafficking in addition to guerilla and paramilitary groups continue to contribute to displacement, as well as natural disasters. The conflict has disproportionately affected Afro-Colombians and indigenous communities.  In addition to the large numbers displaced inside Colombia, an estimated 200,000 Colombians are currently seeking safety in Ecuador, an impoverished country that is also home to the largest refugee population in Latin America.

There are significant unmet humanitarian needs inside Colombia and among the refugees in Ecuador. As displacement has increased over the years, displaced Colombians have fallen deeper into poverty. The U.S. should take all possible steps to ensure that humanitarian assistance is more reflective of the magnitude of the crisis inside Colombia and among refugees in neighboring Ecuador, as well as support durable solutions for Colombian refugees.

For more information, please see these resources:

UNHCR Colombia website and UNHCR Ecuador websiteColombian Neighborhood San Lorenzo Ecuador

Click here for the Spanish translation
See 2013 report update: Still Living on the Edge
 

Displacement continues despite hopes for peace, IDMC

Refugees in Panama face long road to stability, Jesuit Refugee Service

Refugee Status Determination in Latin America: Regional Challenges & Opportunities, USCRI and Asylum Access

Colombia: Transformation Change Must Include Urban IDPs, Refugees International

A pillar of protection:solidarity resettlement for refugees in Latin America, UNHCR/PDES

Colombia Internal Displacement Profile, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre

In the shoes of refugees: providing protection and solutions for displaced Colombians in Ecuador, UNHCR/PDES

Surviving Alone, Refugees International

Enhanced Refugee Registration and Human Security in Northern Ecuador, UNHCR

 

 

 

 

Photo credits: JRS USA/S. Aber